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9 passengers hospitalized after bus driver in eastern Japan “walked away” from traffic light

CHIBA – Nine passengers who were taking a bus in this eastern Japanese city were taken to hospital after the vehicle collided with a traffic light pole at an intersection in the early afternoon June 8.

The youngest of the group sent to the hospital was 5 years old, while the oldest was 80 years old. An elderly woman was treated for serious injuries, including a broken rib. None of those involved in the accident in Chiba, the capital of the prefecture of the same name, are believed to be in danger of death.

According to the Chiba Nishi Police Station, Junichi Takeuchi, 42, a bus driver and employee of the service operating company, was arrested at the scene on suspicion of negligent driving causing injuries. The bus line passes a shopping mall in the city’s Mihama district, and police say the incident itself happened at an intersection near the roundabout in front of JR Kaihimmakuhari Station.

While traveling along the city’s roads, the bus appears to have, for some reason, struck road sign equipment in the middle strip separating the road. Regarding the accident, Takeuchi is said to have said: “I don’t remember clearly, but I got out of the way.”

Bus service operator Chiba Kaihin Kotsu said no issues were found with Takeuchi’s health during this morning’s call before leaving the depot. Police are continuing their investigation for a more detailed cause.

(Japanese original by Tatsuya Naganuma, Chiba Office)


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Bus driver infected with virus in Japan after driving Chinese tourists

(Chinese tourists walk through an area where face masks are sold at an electronics store in Tokyo’s Akihabara district, January 27, 2020.)

TOKYO – The government on Tuesday confirmed three more cases in Japan of the novel coronavirus, including a tourist bus driver who has never been to the central city of Wuhan in China, where the outbreak of the deadly virus began in a market in seafood and poultry.

The bus driver in his 60s became the first Japanese to be infected with the virus in Japan, the health ministry said. He led two groups of Chinese tourists from Wuhan earlier this month.

The results bring the total number of confirmed infections in Japan to seven.

The tour bus made a round trip between Tokyo and Osaka between Jan. 8 and Jan. 16, the ministry said.

He briefly stopped in Nara prefecture in western Japan, according to the prefectural government, which did not give details.

The driver, from Nara, was diagnosed with pneumonia on Saturday and was hospitalized in the prefecture.

The ministry also said a man in his 40s from Wuhan developed pneumonia and was hospitalized in central Aichi Prefecture. He arrived in Japan on January 20.

In the seventh case, a woman in her 40s from the Chinese city was diagnosed with pneumonia on Monday at a medical facility in Hokkaido, the ministry said.

The three new patients are not in serious condition, the ministry said, adding that it is checking the health of people who have been in contact with them.


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1 schoolgirl killed, 12 stabbed at bus stop in Japan | Philippines / Asia

TOKYO – A young schoolgirl was killed and at least 12 others were stabbed at a bus stop just outside the Japanese capital, Tokyo, on Tuesday, national broadcaster NHK said citing the police.

Three adults were also injured, one of them showing no vital signs, after the incident in the city of Kawasaki, south of Tokyo, a city official told Reuters.

The girls, aged around 6 to 7, were students at a private Catholic school waiting for their school bus, NHK said.

The broadcaster said a man detained at the scene also died.

The suspect, a man probably in his 40s or 50s, was unconscious when he was arrested after stabbing himself in the neck, the statement said.

‘I heard screaming’

The man reportedly started slashing people as they waited at the bus stop and then on the bus, he added.

“I heard screams, then saw a man standing with a knife in each hand,” NHK said, citing an unidentified witness. “Then he collapsed to the ground.”

Two knives were found at the scene, NHK said.

The Kawasaki City Fire Department estimated the number of injured at 19, including three with serious injuries.

High profile incidents

Violent crime is relatively rare in Japan, but occasional high-profile incidents have shocked the country.

More than a dozen people were injured in a wave of stabbing in 2010 in a school bus and a commuter bus in the suburbs of Tokyo.

Two years earlier, a 28-year-old man had driven a truck through a crowded crosswalk in Tokyo, killing three people and then fatally stabbing four others.


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1 schoolgirl killed, 12 injured in a stab at a bus stop in Japan | Philippines / Asia

TOKYO – A young schoolgirl was killed and at least 12 others were stabbed at a bus stop just outside the Japanese capital, Tokyo, on Tuesday, national broadcaster NHK said citing the police.

Three adults were also injured, one of them showing no vital signs, after the incident in the city of Kawasaki, south of Tokyo, a city official told Reuters.

The girls, aged around 6 to 7, were students at a private Catholic school waiting for their school bus, NHK said.

The broadcaster said a man detained at the scene also died.

The suspect, a man probably in his 40s or 50s, was unconscious when he was arrested after stabbing himself in the neck, the statement said.

‘I heard screaming’

The man reportedly started slashing people as they waited at the bus stop and then on the bus, he added.

“I heard screams, then saw a man standing with a knife in each hand,” NHK said, citing an unidentified witness. “Then he collapsed to the ground.”

Two knives were found at the scene, NHK said.

The Kawasaki City Fire Department estimated the number of injured at 19, including three with serious injuries.

High profile incidents

Violent crime is relatively rare in Japan, but occasional high-profile incidents have shocked the country.

More than a dozen people were injured in a wave of stabbing in 2010 in a school bus and a commuter bus in the suburbs of Tokyo.

Two years earlier, a 28-year-old man had driven a truck through a crowded crosswalk in Tokyo, killing three people and then fatally stabbing four others.


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Schoolgirl killed, 12 stabbed at bus stop in Japan

TEMPO.CO, Tokyo – A young schoolgirl was killed and at least 12 others were stabbed at a bus stop just outside the Japanese capital Tokyo on Tuesday, national television station NHK said citing police .

Three adults were also injured, one of them showing no vital signs, after the incident in the city of Kawasaki, south of Tokyo, a city official told Reuters. NHK said a suspect held at the scene later died.

The girls, aged around 6 to 7, were students at a private Catholic school waiting for their school bus, NHK said.

The broadcaster said a man detained at the scene also died.

Rescue workers and police are operating at the site where sixteen people were injured in an alleged stabbing by a man, in Kawasaki, Japan on May 28, 2019. Three adults were also injured, one from them showing no vital signs after the incident in Kawasaki City, south of Tokyo, a city official told Reuters. NHK said a suspect held at the scene later died. Kyodo / via REUTERS

The suspect, a man probably in his 40s or 50s, was unconscious when he was arrested after stabbing himself in the neck, the statement said.

The man reportedly started slashing people as they waited at the bus stop and then on the bus, he added.

“I heard screams, then saw a man standing with a knife in each hand,” NHK said, citing an unidentified witness. “Then he collapsed to the ground.”

Two knives were found at the scene, NHK said.

The Kawasaki City Fire Department estimated the number of injured at 19, including three with serious injuries.

Violent crime is relatively rare in Japan, but occasional high-profile incidents have shocked the country.

More than a dozen people were injured in a wave of stabbing in 2010 in a school bus and a commuter bus in the suburbs of Tokyo.

Two years earlier, a 28-year-old man had driven a truck through a crowded crosswalk in Tokyo, killing three people and then fatally stabbing four more.

REUTERS


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Bus stop in Japan injures 16 people, kills 3 – the Mercury News

By Mari Yamaguchi | The Associated Press

TOKYO – Man carrying a knife in each hand and shouting “I’m going to kill you” attacked schoolgirls waiting at a bus stop just outside Tokyo on Tuesday, injuring 16 people and killing three, including the assailant , said the Japanese authorities and the media.

Most of the victims were schoolgirls lined up at a bus stop near Noborito Park in Kawasaki City when the man in his 40s or 50s began slashing them with knives.

Masami Arai, an official at the Kawasaki municipal office, told the AP that 16 people, mostly schoolgirls, were injured and three others, including the assailant, were reportedly killed. Arai said three of the injuries were serious and 13 others were not life threatening.

NHK national television, citing police, said the suspect died after cutting his neck. Police would not immediately confirm the details of this report.

Most of the victims attended a school founded by Sisters of Charity of Quebec, an organization of Catholic nuns from Quebec City in Canada.

A witness told the Mainichi newspaper that he heard children screaming after walking past a bus, and when he turned around, he saw a man brandishing a knife in each hand, shouting “I’m going to kill you” and that several children were on the ground.

NHK, citing police, said a bus driver told authorities a man with a knife in each hand walked towards the bus and started slashing children. NHK also interviewed a witness who said he saw the suspect trying to get his way on a bus.

The identity and motives of the assailant were not immediately known.

TV footage showed rescuers giving first aid to people inside an orange tent set up on the street, and police and other officials transporting the injured to ambulances.

Although Japan has one of the lowest crime rates in the world, it has seen a spate of high-profile murders, including in 2016 when a former worker at a home for the disabled allegedly killed 19 and injured more than 20 others.

In 2008, seven people were killed by a man who slammed a truck into a crowd of people in the electronic district of Akihabara in central Tokyo and then stabbed passers-by.

Also in 2016, a man stabbed four people in a library in northeastern Japan, allegedly for mismanaging his questions. No one was killed.


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2 dead, including 12-year-old girl, in knife attack at bus stop in Japan

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be out of date. Please look at the history’s timestamp to see when it was last updated.

TOKYO —Two people, including a 12-year-old girl, were killed and 16 more children injured in a wave of stabbing in Japan on Tuesday – a rare act of public violence in a country considered one of the safest in the world.

The attack took place near a park in Kawasaki City, about 13 miles from Tokyo, authorities said.

Kawasaki Police said a total of 19 people were stabbed, including the two victims who died. Police said the slain girl was named Hanako Kuribayashi and a male victim named Satoshi Oyama, a 39-year-old government employee.

The alleged attacker also died from a “self-inflicted injury”, Japanese public broadcaster NHK reported. Police officers previously told NHK that the man, who is believed to be between 40 and 50, stabbed himself in the neck.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the attack was “heartbreaking”.

“We must ensure the safety of our children at all costs,” Abe told reporters. “I have called on the ministers concerned to take immediate action to ensure the safety of children when they go and leave school.

NHK reported earlier Tuesday that three people – including an elementary school student – were in critical condition. It is not known if the deceased girl was one of them.

Japan is considered one of the safest developed countries in the world. It has one of the lowest homicide rates in the world, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

Several locals said they were shocked that such an attack could take place in what is usually a quiet town.

Kosuzu Sunayama, 26, who lives near where the stabbing took place, said she could hear screams from her home.

“It’s not the kind of place to have such an incident. It’s not the kind of place to get such horrible news, ”Sunayama said. “I feel sick.”

Mass stabbing is extremely rare in Japan. In 2016, 19 people were killed in a wave of stabbing at a disabled care home – the deadliest massacre in Japan since the end of World War II.

Japan also strictly regulates guns, and it’s illegal for people to carry a pocket knife, craft knife, hunting knife or cutter in public, according to the US State Department.

Tuesday’s incident took place during US President Donald Trump’s visit to the country. Speaking aboard a Japanese helicopter carrier, Trump said the American people mourn the families of the victims.


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Man stabs children at bus stop in Japan; at least 19 people injured

TOKYO – A man carrying a knife in each hand and shouting “I’m going to kill you” attacked a group of schoolchildren waiting at a bus stop just outside Tokyo on Tuesday, injuring at least 19 people, including 13 children, Japanese authorities and media said.

The victims were lined up at a bus stop near Noborito Park in Kawasaki City when a man in his 40s and 50s attacked. NHK national television, citing police, said the suspect died after slitting his neck. Police would not immediately confirm the report or provide other specific details.

It was not immediately clear how many more had died.

A Kawasaki fire official told The Associated Press that one person was killed. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media. Some Japanese media reported at least three deaths, while others reported two, including the assailant.

The Kyodo News Agency reported that the 13 children who were stabbed were girls from a nearby private school in Kawasaki town.

A witness told the Mainichi newspaper that he heard children screaming after walking past a bus, and when he turned around, he saw a man brandishing a knife in each hand, shouting “I’m going to kill you” and that several children were on the ground.

NHK, citing police, said a bus driver told authorities a man with a knife in each hand walked towards the bus and started slashing children. NHK also interviewed a witness who said he saw the suspect trying to get his way on a bus.

The identity and motives of the assailant were not immediately known.

TV footage showed rescuers giving first aid to people inside an orange tent set up on the street, and police and other officials transporting the injured to ambulances.

Although Japan has one of the lowest crime rates in the world, it has seen a spate of high-profile murders, including in 2016 when a former worker at a home for the disabled allegedly killed 19 and injured more than 20 others.

In 2008, seven people were killed by a man who slammed a truck into a crowd of people in the electronic district of Akihabara in central Tokyo and then stabbed passers-by.

Also in 2016, a man stabbed four people in a library in northeastern Japan, allegedly for mismanaging his questions. No one was killed.


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Rising costs and decreasing ridership: Japanese bus lines struggle to generate profits

Nationwide bus service balance sheets are deteriorating amid rising labor and fuel costs. Bus lines in regions outside urban areas are the most in difficulty in the face of aging and shrinking populations.

A report from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism paints a grim picture for companies operating bus lines. Combined operators’ revenues in fiscal 2017 grew 1.0% year-on-year to 732.2 billion yen, but expenses increased 2.1% to 766.2 billion yen. The resulting current account balance of 95.6% represents a decrease of almost 1 percentage point compared to the previous year. Business conditions have become particularly difficult for bus services in areas with declining populations, such as Hokkaidō, Tōhoku, and Shikoku.

Of the 245 companies with a fleet of 30 or more buses providing general passenger services, only 75 were in the dark, 14 fewer than the previous year. The number of companies in the red rose by 13 to a total of 170. The figures mean that a majority of companies, 69.4%, are in deficit. Although the number of passengers served increased 0.5% year-over-year to 3.9 billion, it remains below 40% of the 10.1 billion served in the peak year of 1968 The rise in personnel costs is also weighing on companies.

Of the 21 regions listed in the report, only four have a current account balance greater than 100%. These are the prefecture of Chiba (107.9%); the Musashi / Sagami area of ​​Saitama, Tokyo and Kanagawa prefectures (104.1%); the Keihin area which includes the 23 central municipalities of Tokyo and the suburbs of Mitaka, Musashino, Chōfu, Komae, Kawasaki and Yokohama (104.4%); and the Keihanshin region comprising Kobe, Kyoto and Osaka (101.3%). Regions that have fallen well below the 100% level include Shikoku (68.6%), Uetsu which includes Akita, Yamagata and Niigata prefectures (76.7%), Tōhoku (72.3%) and northern Hokkaidō (72.9%). Major urban areas averaged a current account balance of 102.5%, while other regions averaged 86.1%.

In provincial areas, bus services are a vital lifeline for older non-drivers in particular, and local governments frequently subsidize the services to keep them running.

The situation is not much better for bus services in urban areas, and many struggle to be profitable. Fiscal 2017 figures released by the Tokyo Metropolitan Bureau of Transportation for the 127 lines of its Toei bus service show that 81 lines were in the red while only 46 were making a profit. Normally the task would be to improve revenues to turn some lines from red to black, but with the entire industry facing a chronic shortage of drivers, Toei Bus even has to cut services for profitable lines.

(Translated from Japanese. Banner photo © Pixta.)


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The world must learn from the bus strike in Japan

The world must learn from the bus strike in Japan

Japan has always made the headlines for unthinkable ethical news. This time, too, they made the headlines for a strike that they undertook in a different way. A bus strike! We can never interfere with or manipulate a labor strike, whether in any part of the world. But the Japanese bus drivers put a twist on this very usual bus strike between the drivers and the company. With the nationwide bus strike entering week four from the start with little to much inconvenience, the bus drivers made sure their complaint was heard. They have achieved it not only in Japan, but the whole world is now raising their voices using this type of strike.

Bus drivers from Ryobi Group in the Okayama district launched the protest as a management, and the drivers could not get an agreement on the safety of their work. This tension comes after a competing company began to compete with low fares, which sparked insecurity among the company’s drivers.

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How they conducted their protest is what the world has to learn. Contrary to the usual way, they did not stop their buses to cause public inconvenience. They continued to drive the buses but covered and turned off their ticket machines and allowed local commuters to travel for free. Thus not disrupting the daily life of people but causing a lot of losses to the company.

Usually, where it is the minority party that suffers a lot of losses, this time the Japanese bus drivers have made sure to reverse the cycle. It is always the poor who lose the battle and in this case the bus drivers and commuters. But with this strategy, the business will suffer a lot of losses and the drivers will lose their income, but the passengers will not be affected. With little difference in the points being easier on both sides, let’s hope this strike ends soon and brings a change to union struggles all over the world.

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Amrit Mirchandani

A con artist, who believes that there is a solution to every problem. There are two ways to be successful in life – by working hard and working smart with the right mix of the two. I am a 27 year old entrepreneur, currently living in IT Center India, Pune, and an extremely sympathetic and optimistic person. I was born and raised on the beautiful island of Sri Lanka and have run businesses ranging from agriculture to the digital world all over the world. I have had crazy experiences in bustling Asian cities like Mumbai and Kuala Lumpur in African countries like Madagascar. My passion is to create solutions to everyday problems using the right connections and the right approach. Always ready to learn anything and everything. I love the gym, the beaches and traveling! Believes that the media can change the world for a much better place, by spreading the good news and opinions! However, believes that the mainstream media is a bias, over time the policy in the image media will benefit the world.


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