Monthly Archives January 2018

Japanese trains bark like dogs so deer don’t get run over

In order to protect wildlife, trains in Japan started barking like dogs and sniffing like deer to avoid accidents.

According to a Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun, deer often congregate to lick train tracks in the evenings and late at night – which, unfortunately, leads to regular collisions.

However, authorities found that the howl of animal sounds from the tops of oncoming trains had the deer hunted in time to avoid any accidents.

Officials from the Railway Technical Research Institute said there were 45% fewer deer on the tracks when sounds were emitted, compared to when trains were running normally.

They explained that deer repeatedly gave a small, high-pitched snort when they wanted to alert other deer of danger.

The researchers decided to combine the warning growl with the sound of an animal that deer fear – dogs. During testing, a three-second recording of a deer sniffing and 20 seconds of a barking dog was played from a moving train car at night.

Deer were seen on trains only 7.5 times every 100 km, about 45% less than when the sounds were not emitted.

According to an RTRI official who spoke to the Japanese newspaper, “If our new device works, it will avoid having to install anti-intrusion installations in many places. “


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Japanese trains bark like dogs and sniff like deer to stop accidents

Bork Bork (Photo: Getty Images)

In Japan, trains started barking like dogs and sniffing like deer in order to avoid accidents.

According to the Asahi Shimbun newspaper, deer often congregate to lick train tracks in the evening and late at night, which unfortunately leads to regular collisions.

thumbnail for message id 15354273

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However, it was found that the howling of animal sounds from the top of the oncoming train keeps the deer away enough in time to avoid any accidents.

Officials at the Railway Technical Research Institute said there were 45% fewer deer on the tracks when sounds were playing, compared to when trains were running normally.

They explained that deer repeatedly gave a small, high-pitched snort when they wanted to alert other deer of danger.

Deer are afraid of dogs (Photo: Getty Images)

With that in mind, the researchers decided to combine the warning growl with the sound of an animal that deer are afraid of – dogs.

During testing, a three-second recording of a deer sniffing and 20 seconds of a barking dog was played from a moving train car at night.

thumbnail for message id 15354273

Australia to finally allow citizens to re-enter the country after an 18-month ban

Deer were seen on trains only 7.5 times every 100 km, about 45% less than when the sounds were not emitted.

An RTRI official told the Asahi: “If our new device works, it will avoid having to install anti-intrusion installations in many places.

“We hope to finish it in a system that works in mountainous areas and elsewhere so the railways will want to introduce it.”


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